Lifestyle

Farewell, my lovely

Farewell, my lovely

It’s almost over. Venus has been dazzling and delighting us for months now, the best apparition of the evening star since 2004. It’s still amazingly bright in the northwest during the first couple of hours after sunset. It’s hard to believe that this will now change so rapidly.

Do ecological research as a family project, virtually, via Cary Institute’s 2020 Hudson Data Jam

Do ecological research as a family project, virtually, via Cary Institute’s 2020 Hudson Data Jam

The 2020 Hudson Data Jam competition will be 100 percent virtual. Cary Institute educators will be offering informational webinars and instructional videos to help parents, students and educators learn how to work with data and create a project that clearly communicates the data trends you discover. Participants must register by May 13 and submit their project results online by May 27.

Fossils of the Catskill Sea

Fossils of the Catskill Sea

Illustrations from a nineteenth-century geology textbook show typical marine shellfish fossils of Devonian age, a time period running from 419 to 369 million years ago. That’s the age of almost all the rocks here in the Catskills. Those fossils speak to geologists of a time when all of our region lay beneath the waves of a shallow sea, sometimes called the Catskill Sea.

The evening star at its very best

The evening star at its very best

This week, Venus has reached its greatest separation from the sun while standing high above where the sun set. These are rare perfect conditions that make Venus appear as high up as is ever possible. But on top of that, Venus is also at its most brilliant.

In quest of a true spectacle

In quest of a true spectacle

We all enjoy sky-spectacles, and especially those that do not require a telescope. Some are not too frustratingly rare, such as brilliant meteors and rainbows. And we can greatly increase the odds of seeing these if we know when they’re most likely.